Welcome

from the

Western States Board of Governors

"The Tevis Cup: A Horsemen''s Journey Since 1955"

The Board of Governors of the Western States Trail Foundation (WSTF) welcomes you to an endurance riding event of distinction, recognized as one of the world''s best tests of true horsemanship.

The Tevis Cup Ride is the founding modern-day equestrian event of...read more


8/11/15

GRANITE CHIEF LAND PURCHASE COMPLETED

With escrow closed, 10,000-acre purchase area near Granite Chief Wilderness opens to public, preserving Tevis and Western States events on historic Western States Trail

AUBURN, Calif. – A year-long fundraising and negotiating effort to help the American River Conservancy purchase a strategically vital 10,000-acre parcel for public use has been completed, the Western States Trail Foundation and the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run Foundation announced on Tuesday. Escrow for the $11 million purchase of old-growth forest and mountain meadows near Granite Chief Wilderness and the Western States Trail closed late last week.

“Both of our boards are extremely pleased that this acquisition has been finalized,” Western States Trail Foundation president Tony Benedetti and Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run Foundation president John Trent said in a joint statement. “Opening the entire 100 miles of the Western States Trail to hikers, runners and equestrians has been one of the overriding goals of this effort. Now that this 10,000-acre area has been acquired by the ARC and is no longer a private holding, the public is the clear winner. Both the Tevis Cup 100-Mile Ride and the Western States 100-Mile Run will now have perpetual guaranteed access to the last privately-held section of the Western States Trail, ensuring no disruption for the future of either event. In addition, the acquisition now enables the United States Forest Service to complete its National Trail designation for the Western States Trail.”

The ARC, of Coloma, Calif., having partnered with Northern Sierra Partnership of Palo Alto, Calif., and the Nature Conservancy earlier this year, was able to reach its fundraising goal of $11 million in late July. Through fundraising and matching efforts of their own, the Western States Trail Foundation ($250,000) and the Western States 100-Mile Endurance Run Foundation ($100,000) contributed to the ARC’s total.

“We are so appreciative for the generosity the Ride and Run communities have shown over the past year,” Benedetti and Trent said jointly. “Our stakeholders have recognized the importance of this project. They’ve stepped up to the plate with donations, and with their overwhelming support in making sure we were able to cross the finish line for this project. It’s been quite an effort over the past year to organize, to raise money, and to make sure that the interests of our stakeholders were well-represented throughout the entire process.”

The 10,000 acres, located immediately west of Lake Tahoe and Squaw Valley, Calif., had been previously owned by a timber investment firm. It includes 1,200 acres of mountain meadow and is considered a vital part of the State and Federal water delivery system to 23 million Californians. The area includes four “blue-ribbon” trout streams and three popular trails, including the hiking/running and equestrian trail used by the Tevis Cup and Western States 100 events, as well as the Picayune Valley Trail.

Western States Trail Foundation

Western States Endurance Run


2015 WSTF Golf Tournament

September 29th at Winchester Country Club.

  TEVIS GOLF TOURNAMENT 2015 Information Flyer FINAL2 Sm 
More info here.


Help Preserve the Historic Western States Trail

SwiningBridge20131116 145734Swinging Bridge RebuiltBarbaraWhite33

A primary mission of the Western States Trail Foundation is to preserve the historic route taken by Paiute and Washoe Indians, Gold Rush explorers, Comstock hopefuls, and Express Riders of the Wells Fargo and Adams Express Companies. Today this route provides us with rewards of exploration, challenge, accomplishment, wilderness, nature and a bolstering of spirit for horsemen, hikers and runners alike.

In 1996 the Board of Governors of the Western States Trail Foundation determined the need to establish a permanent endowment fund to insure future funding of maintenance and improvements to the Western States Trail. Please take a moment to read our 2014 endowment brochure and please give what you can to help preserve the Western States Trail.

 

Financial AppealDonation Form

The Western States Trail Endowment Fund
is a 501(c)(3) non-profit charitable organization

from The Western States Trail Guide
Historical Notes by Hal V. Hall
© WESTERN STATES TRAIL FOUNDATION, All Rights Reserved

The Quarry Vetcheck is held in an open area along the railbed of the old Mountain Quarries narrow gauge railroad. The rail bed follows along the river on the lower edge of a limestone quarry that has been in operation since the late 1800's. Upon departing the vetcheck, riders continue along the course of the old rail line, crossing Highway 49 and then No Hands Bridge, historically known as the Mountain Quarries Bridge.

This vetcheck location is often refered to as the "Lower Quarry," since in many Ride years, and as recently as 1996, the ride course has taken a somewhat different course. In those cases, the vetcheck was held in a truck weighstation yard in the "Upper Quarry" area, immediately beside Highway 49, about two miles from the town of Cool. After crossing the road, the trail winds along well uphill of the highway, rejoining the lower route just before No Hands Bridge.

The Quarry Vetcheck is NOT open to crews. The Ride provides water and feed for the horses and refreshments for the riders. In the event that a horse is pulled, the railroad bed provides trailer access to Highway 49.